A Travellerspoint blog

April 2012

Dip 'n Ouma

For my Afrikaans friends and family

Ek kan dit nie glo nie. Ons is in Halls Creek in die middel van die Kimberley en Outback en Lorraine het Ouma karringmelk beskuit in die lokale IGA supermark gekry. Die Suid Afrikaanse invloed strek wyd!

So, more oggend dip ek 'n Ouma.

Ouma Beskuit in die Outback

Ouma Beskuit in die Outback

Posted by KobusM 18:26 Archived in Australia Comments (2)

Caroline Pool

11 km from Halls Creek

sunny 30 °C

We camped at Caroline Pool 11 km outside Halls Creek and it is a very nice free camping spot close to Old Halls Creek. The pool has no crocodiles, or at leas not whilst we were there and whilst I was swimming.

We also visited China Wall close to Caroline Pool, a vertical quarts formation that looks like a mini Great Wall of China.

We are on our way to Purnululu National Park and looking forward to this that should be one of our highlights of the tour. One of the side roads of the Gibb River Road is now open and we are pleased with the progress. Hopefully when we leave Purnululu next week all the roads will be open and we can return to start the Gibb River road journey.

Caroline Pool

Caroline Pool


Swimming in Caroline Pool

Swimming in Caroline Pool

Posted by KobusM 18:19 Archived in Australia Comments (0)

Closed roads in the Kimberley

Camping at Boab Quarry, Oscar Ranges

sunny 32 °C

We were surprised and very disappointed to find a sign at the entrance of the Gibb River Road showing all side roads, that give access to the gorges on the Gibb River Road like Windjana and Bells Gorges, were closed. We were hoping to start exploring Windjana Gorge and Tunnel Creek National Parks before we travel east along the Gibb River Road, but now that will not be possible until all the roads are open. I focused only on the main Gibb River Road and Kalumburu Road and foolishly assumed the side roads would be open.

As we were already on plan B with our delay, we decided to go to plan C and to travel south in the direction of Fitzroy Crossing and spend a couple of days at Myrodaah Crossing on the Fitzroy River, but when we turned off the main road towards Myrodaah we found this road also closed.

After a quick adjustment plan D took us closer to Fitzroy Crossing and 11 km up the closed Windjana road to Boab Quarry in the Oscar Ranges. It is a peaceful, picturesque, free camping spot with the backdrop of boab trees amongst the eroded limestone ranges. The rocks in the ranges are rugged and razor sharp, part of a fossilized coral reef eroded over millions of years. We were delighted to see a group of Red Winged Parrots and a pair of White Cockotoos at our camp spot. We enjoyed the evening by sitting outside and watching the spectacular milky way and the odd meteorite. Much better than TV!

With the road closed we are the only people at the camp spot and I suspect we are actually broke the law by travelling on an officially closed road, but the 11km was just a normal dirt road and no harm was done by this short, probable illegal detour.

I am pleased with the decision to buy the Quantum that makes us completely self-sufficient to camp in a spot like this. We have now also invested in a second set of solar panels to keep the battery in the Land Cruiser charged which powers the 2nd fridge in the back of the Land Cruiser when we do long stopovers without electricity.

We have now arrived in Firtzroy Crossing and will stay here for 2-3 days exploring Geikie Gorge National Park and I also plan to try some Barramundi fishing. If the roads remains closed after this we will travel to Wolfe Creek Crater and Purnululu National Parks and return to do the Gibb River Road and its side roads later once it is open, and at this stage the information we have is that it will take another two weeks for water levels to drop at the river crossings.

Closed side roads from the Gibb River Road

Closed side roads from the Gibb River Road


Closed road to Myroodah

Closed road to Myroodah


Oscar Ranges

Oscar Ranges


Camping at Boab Quarry, Oscar Ranges

Camping at Boab Quarry, Oscar Ranges


Boab Quarry

Boab Quarry


Red Winged Parrot in the Oscar Ranges

Red Winged Parrot in the Oscar Ranges

Posted by KobusM 21:00 Archived in Australia Comments (0)

Derby

and the story of Jandamarra

sunny 32 °C

We finally left Broome and the Dampier Peninsula where we eventually spent a total of 20 days. Quondong Point was such a nice and peaceful spot we stayed there for three nights. We have now arrived in Derby, about 230km north-east of Broome. Derby (pronounced derr-bee) is a laid-back Kimberley town with Boab lined streets and huge mud flats on the edge of King Sound. Its only claim to fame is that it has the highest tides in Australia, in fact the southern hemisphere, an astonishing 11,8 meters. However, another historical fact is that Derby was the first town to be established in the Kimberley and is therefore the pioneer town of the Kimberley.

The Boab Prison Tree outside Derby is an interesting site and has an equally interesting history. It was used in the 1890s as a lockup for Aboriginal prisoners on their way to Derby, including Jandamarra, also known as Pigeon. Jandamarra led a resistance group against European settler encroachment of the tribal lands and he is in a way the Aboriginal version of Ned Kelly. During that time the European settlers were opening up large parts of the Kimberley and in the process Aboriginal people were driven from their lands. Some were rounded up and forced to work on cattle stations. Aboriginal people were also not allowed to hunt anymore on their lands and the only, easy alternative was to spear the cattle and sheep of the settlers. The Aboriginals that were caught were chained around the neck and marched to Derby to do forced labour and this is where the hollow Boab Prison Tree came in useful as a lockup. Jandamarra was also jailed for spearing cattle and after his prison term he worked on the cattle stations where he became friends with Police Constable Richardson and started working as a tracker for the police. He became a skilled horseman and marksman and was very useful to the police, but it turned out that he never abondoned his roots. During a patrol in the Napier ranges Richardson and Jandamarra captured a large group of Jandamarra's tribe, the Bunuba, and they were held in custody at Lillimura Police Post for a number of days. Jandamarra was overcome with remorse about his treason and shot Richardson, freed the prisoners, stole some weopons and dissapeared into the bush. From then on he used the ranges and caves of Windjana Gorge and Tunnel Creek as hideouts and led a resistance guerilla war for three years against the European settlers, killing at least two men. His ability to appear out of nowhere and to dissapear without a trace became legend. In 1894 he was tracked down in Windjana Gorge and shot and left for dead only to have been found to dissapear again. The Aboriginal people were in awe of Jandamarra, believing he had magical powers and was immortal. He was eventually tracked down by an Aboriginal police tracker called Micky and shot and killed in Tunnel Creek on 1 April 1897. The white policemen cut off Jandamarra's head as proof that he was dead, preserved and send it to England as an example of the effectiveness of their firearms. The Boab Prison Tree is believed to be around 1500 years old and has a girth of 14,7 meters.

Derby is the western access to the picturesque but notorious Gibb River Road (GRR). The GRR is now open for 4WD vehicles under 15 tons although parts of it are still being graded at the moment. We will just stay in Derby long enough to replenish our stocks and then start the Gibb River Road in a couple of days, first exploring the western side and its gorges and ranges. The Kalumburu road north of Drysdale River, which gives access to the Northern Kimberley and the Mitchell Plateau, is still closed but according to the Shire of Wynham the work on it is progressing and it might be opened in a couple of weeks. So we might be travelling to the Mitchell Falls and Honeymoon Bay after all and will be in the "bush" for two to three weeks.

http://www.jandamarra.com.au/jandamarratheman.html

Boab Prison Tree outside Derby

Boab Prison Tree outside Derby


Airial photo of Derby showing the tidal mud flats

Airial photo of Derby showing the tidal mud flats


Sobering Up Center for Aboriginals Derby

Sobering Up Center for Aboriginals Derby


Derby Old Jail

Derby Old Jail

Posted by KobusM 01:22 Archived in Australia Comments (1)

Gibb River Road

Finally we are ready to travel one of the most notorious roads in Australia

sunny 34 °C

The Gibb River Road is the 4WD option from Derby to Wyndham (or vice-versa), about 700 km long and it takes you through the heart of the Kimberley and is probably one of the most picturesque roads in Australia. The Gibb River Road is closed for most of the wet season and as is the case now, well into the dry season, to repair it after the damage the monsoon rains and cyclones have caused.

http://www.gibbriverroad.net/

We will take about 14 days to explore The Gibb, as the locals call it, including the surrounding parks, gorges and ranges. The Gibb is today declared closed again between Mt. Barnett and Pentecost River due to heavy rain on Monday, but we will first detour from the western part of The Gibb to visit Windjana National Park and Tunnel Creek National Park and then also do a detour into the King Leopold Ranges Conservation Park to visit the famous Bells Gorge and maybe Mt Hart Wilderness Lodge as well. We also plan to visit Manning gorge, Emma Gorge and El Questro once we get through the center of The Gibb, and hopefully it will be open then.

However, the Kalumburu Road is probably going to be opened soon too (the attached photo shows the satus a couple of weeks ago) and visiting the northern, remote part of the Kimberley has been part of our plan from the start. So we might get the opportunity to take the long detour north and visit Drysdale River Station, Mitchell Falls and Honeymoon Bay.

We will spend a couple of days in Derby to clean up and replenish our stocks before we start the Gibb River Road and we will be without mobile network coverage almost all the way from Derby to Wyndham for two weeks and if we take the Kalumburu Road north is will be three weeks. We will therefore only post an update to the blog in about two to three weeks. Watch this space or click on the Subscribe button to get an automatic notification of an update on the blog.

Gibb River Road and Kalumburu Road in the Kimberley

Gibb River Road and Kalumburu Road in the Kimberley


Kalumburu road on 9 Apr 2012

Kalumburu road on 9 Apr 2012

Posted by KobusM 16:33 Archived in Australia Comments (0)

Quondong Point

Free camping on the west coast of the Dampier Peninsula

sunny 34 °C

The estimated date for opening of the Gibb River Road is now 6 May and we have decided to stay in the Dampier Peninsula for a couple more days, maybe three, before we go to Derby, where the Gibb River Road starts. Many of the fellow travellers we met on the road are of the same opinion that we should spend as much time as we can in the Kimberley, so will will take it easy and wait for the Gibb River Road to open.

We chose Quondong Point campsite, about 50km north of Broome on the west coast of the Dampier Peninsula, accessible only by 4WD. It is a very nice campsite, with no facilities, but with a stunning view over the beaches and the sea and it is free! I am not sure where the Chinese name for the campsite originated from but taking the strong Chinese influence on Broome it is not surprising.

We got the damaged awning and the cracked windscreen replaced in Broome and we now crossing fingers it will be our last insurance claims.

Quandong Point is our favourite spot so far and we are staying an extra night. We are the only people camping here in a radius of about a kilometer and it is peaceful and relaxing. This morning we saw a dingo sniffing through our campsite and every morning we saw a group of Red Winged Parrots in a tree close to the Land Cruiser and I took some nice photos.

Road to Quondong Point

Road to Quondong Point


Quondong Point

Quondong Point


Our first campfire for the Big Lap

Our first campfire for the Big Lap


Low tide at Quondong Point

Low tide at Quondong Point


Fishing at Quondong Point

Fishing at Quondong Point


Red Winged Parrot at Quondong Point

Red Winged Parrot at Quondong Point


Aussie campoven dinner at Quondong Point

Aussie campoven dinner at Quondong Point

Posted by KobusM 23:19 Archived in Australia Comments (1)

Buccaneer Archipelago

Scenic flight to Horizontal Waterfalls

sunny 34 °C

Eventually we got a confirmed scenic flight charter this morning and we are pleased that we were patient to wait for it.

The Buccaneer Archipelago is a stunningly rugged area formed by a group of about 800 to 1000 rocky islands, with large mangrove forests, covering 50 square kilometers north-east of Dampier peninsula. The area has huge tidal ranges up to 12 meters and this created the phenomena of the horizontal, reversible waterfalls called Horizontal Waterfalls in Talbot Bay. The waterfall is caused by the differential created when massive tides rush through the narrow gaps between the two islands, creating two horizontal waterfalls flowing across the face of the ocean and then reversing at the turn of the tide. Another feature of the huge tidal flows are the massive whirlpools in the bays of the archipelago.

The area is remote and uninhabited except for bats, snakes, crocodiles, lizards, monitors and of course fish. Well, that is what we thought until we saw the open pit iron ore mines on two of the islands, Koolan and Cockatoo. At its peak Koolan island had a population of 950 people. Once mined by BHP Billiton but now taken over by minor mining groups, these mines are a real scar on this pristine, remote archipelago. But I should not be too hipocrytical, I am sure I saw at least two Atlas Copco drill rigs in the mine.

We invited two staff members from Kooljaman to join us and they enjoyed the flight as much as we did. I must admit this is almost as spectacular as flying over the Victoria Waterfalls.

We are back in Broome and our awning has arrived and will be replaced this afternoon. Tomorrow we will continue onto Derby and the Gibb River Road, although the Gibb River Road is still closed in the middle between Mt Barnett and Home Valley, but we will wait until it opens. We have given up on the Kalumburu road up to Mitchell Falls and Honeymoon Bay as it is completely washed away in places and the chances of that opening soon is very remote.

Horizontal Waterfalls, Buccaneer Archipelago

Horizontal Waterfalls, Buccaneer Archipelago


Horizontal Falls, Buccaneer Archipelago

Horizontal Falls, Buccaneer Archipelago


Buccaneer Archipelago

Buccaneer Archipelago


White beaches of Cape Leveque

White beaches of Cape Leveque


Buccaneer Archipelago

Buccaneer Archipelago


One Arm Point

One Arm Point


Boat heading into a huge whirlpool in Buccaneer archiplelago

Boat heading into a huge whirlpool in Buccaneer archiplelago


Buccaneer Archipelago

Buccaneer Archipelago


Open pit mine on Koolan island in Buccaneer archipelago

Open pit mine on Koolan island in Buccaneer archipelago

Posted by KobusM 00:23 Archived in Australia Comments (0)

Cape Leveque

Noisy two days, hopefully the third will be peaceful

sunny 35 °C

Kooljaman at Cape Leveque is a very nice remote wilderness resort but we were unlucky that a large group of very noisy aboriginal school kids from Broome arrived soon after we set up camp and checked in right next to us. That was the end of our peace and quiet. We were spoiled by the solitude of Nature's Hideaway at Middle Lagoon. Luckilly they packed up and left after two days and as our new replacement awning has not arrived in Broome yet, we decided to stay another night to recover and to finally get onto the scenic flight to Buccaneer Archipelago tomorrow morning.

We did enjoy the swimming and snorkelling beach on the eastern side and the sunsets on the western side of Cape Leveque. The sunsets are spectacular with the red cliffs right on the beach adding to the spectacle.

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Posted by KobusM 18:42 Archived in Australia Comments (0)

One Arm Point

Dampier Peninsula

sunny 35 °C

Today we drove up from Middle Lagoon to the tip of the Dampier Peninsula and visited the aboriginal community of Ardiyooloon at One Arm Point on the eastern side of the tip. We had to register at the community office and pay $10 each for a day pass. With the bright day passes strapped around our arms we were clearly identified as fully paid day visitors. We tried to get access to the Joolboon Hatchery, the only real tourist attraction in town, where they breed Trochus shells, but is was closed. At least the view of the channel leading into the King Sound is spectacular with amazing rushing rip tides at 12-14 knots and tidal varients of up to 11 meters.

So, basically there was nothing else to see in One Arm Point as all roads leading into the town are clearly marked that they are for local access only. We took some pictures and left with a feeling of being hustled out of $20. At least we met a local white fella working at the local clinic, that assured us we can get access to Kooljaman Resort with the Quantum and we headed there early in the afternoon. We got a shady campsite on the provision that we don't use the airconditioner, which we gladly accepted. Kooljaman is at Cape Leveque on the western tip of the Dampier Peninsula and is a very nice resort with a restaurant, lots of activities and tomorrow we are planning to take a scenic flight over the Buccaneer Archipelago to see the Horizontal Falls.

One day permits for One Arm Point

One day permits for One Arm Point


One Arm Point Stop signs

One Arm Point Stop signs


King Sound rip tide atg One Arm Point

King Sound rip tide atg One Arm Point

Posted by KobusM 01:51 Archived in Australia Comments (1)

Nature's Hideaway

Middle Lagoon, Dampier Peninsula

sunny 35 °C

Nature's Hideaway at Middle Lagoon is a tranquil coastal camp in an isolated cove, 180km north of Broome, with stunning views over Pender Bay. It took us more than two and a half hours to drive up here on a fairly rough unsealed road suitable only for 4WDs.

Nature’s Hideaway at Middle Lagoon reminded me strongly of the Southern Mozambique’s coast near Inhambane. We have a number of beach holidays there and I think it’s the remoteness, the coconut trees, the wonderful beaches, the rustic campsites and the mosquitos that are similar.

It is not easy to get there with a very rough 80km 4WD road to negotiate before you get to the sealed road close to Beagle Bay and then there is another 30km single track sandy road to get you to Middle Lagoon.

We saw many Black Cockatoos whilst in Nature’s Hideaway and they are such a pleasure to watch. Then there are the ever present noisy black ravens.

One afternoon whilst lying on the beach after a swim I saw a number of dolphins swimming in the bay, about 500 meters from the shoreline. I quickly gathered my mask and fins and tried to swim to them but about halfway I felt that there were stingers in the water. I decided to abandon the swim with the dolphins and swam back to shore. On the way back I was stung three times and I saw at least one box jelly fish close to me. This made me very anxious to get out of the water because box jelly fish is the most dangerous and venomous creature on earth. Luckily the stings were not serious and a quick spray of Stingose solved the problem. I was lucky; apparently a venomous sting only gives you a few minutes to live. I saw dolphins many times after that but did not go after them in fear of getting stung again.

In night we had snapper for dinner as a local aboriginal offered me a fish as they caught too many to consume themselves.

There is no mobile network coverage at Middle Lagoon but if you walk across the bay and climb one of the high dunes or rocks you just get enough signal to download e-mails and messages but not strong enough to send any. The satellite phone came in handy to make the arrangements for the replacement of the damaged awning.

We stayed for six days before driving up further north to the tip of the Dampier Peninsula to One Arm Point, where we will camp for 2-3 days before returning to Broome to get the damaged awning replaced.

Road to Middle Lagoon

Road to Middle Lagoon


Camping at Nature's Hideaway, Middle Lagoon

Camping at Nature's Hideaway, Middle Lagoon


Middle Lagoon

Middle Lagoon


Middle Lagoon rocks

Middle Lagoon rocks


Framed

Framed


Weird rock formations on Middle Lagoon

Weird rock formations on Middle Lagoon


Eroded rocks on Middle Lagoon

Eroded rocks on Middle Lagoon


Black Cockatoos at Middle Lagoon

Black Cockatoos at Middle Lagoon


Black Cockatoo

Black Cockatoo


Nature's Hideaway camping at Middle Lagoon

Nature's Hideaway camping at Middle Lagoon


Sunset over Middle Lagoon, Dampier Peninsula, WA

Sunset over Middle Lagoon, Dampier Peninsula, WA

Posted by KobusM 21:00 Archived in Australia Comments (0)

Violent tropical storm

Quantum awning tipped apart

storm 32 °C

Our last night in Broome.....well, that's what we thought. We were sitting outside watching a storm developing in the east over Roebuck Bay and I was taking photos of the lightning, enjoying the wonderful view. We finished watching the spectacular storm in the distance then lit the Weber to cook a pizza and suddenly the wind picked up and became stronger and stronger. Earlier, I secured the awning poles with extra ropes and was confident that it would withstand the storm but the wind picked up more and became gale force strength. I tried to hold onto the awning pole but the debris was flying at such a force towards me that I decided it would be safer inside the Quantum and as I entered the Quantum a huge gust ripped the awning apart and tore it off completely.

So, we now have to get the awning fixed or replaced first before we can depart from Broome....and that might take time.

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Posted by KobusM 04:43 Archived in Australia Comments (3)

Broome

Tropical town with a lot of surprises

sunny 36 °C

We like Broome. It is hot and humid but a very pleasant little town, with a lot of history and culture and even has a Chinatown.

The first night we stayed close to the famous Cable Beach and enjoyed a couple of hours on the beach in the afternoon. Although Cable Beach is spectacular by all standards, it still does not come close to Eighty Mile Beach, which is our favourite beach so far. The next day we took the Quantum for its first service and after that moved to Roebuck Caravan Park which is located on Roebuck Bay and managed to get a beachfront stand with a nice view of the bay.

Broome is also famous for the 'Stairway to the Moon' event when the full moon rises over Roebuck Bay at low tide and tonight we had an excellent vantage point from our campsite. The tides in Roebuck Bay are quite remarkable, especially at spring tide. The distance between the high and low tide marks must be at least 1000 meters if not more.

On Good Friday we had our first overcast day after a thunderstorm in the morning that cooled us down a bit. It was a refreshing break from the very hot days, but in the afternoon the mercury rose to 35 degrees again and the humidity was even higher than before.

William Dampier was the first European to visit this shore in 1688 and Roebuck Bay was named after his ship, HMS Roebuck. However, it took almost 200 years for Broome to be gazetted as a town and named in honour of the then Governor of Western Australia, Sir Frederick Napier Broome. The discovery of the largest pearl shell in the world in the waters of Roebuck Bay, the 'Pinctada maxima', led to the establishment of Broome's pearling industry. Broome produced 80% of the world's Mother of Pearl shell in the first decade of the 20th century. While pearling was prosperous for the pearling masters, it was often fatal for the divers who were subject to 'the bends', drowning, shark attacks and cyclones. The local Japanese cemetry is the resting place of 919 Japanese divers who lost their lives working in the pearling industry. The develoment of the plastic button in the 1950s sealed the fate of the Mother of Pearl shell industry. However, the industry was revitalised in the late 1950s with the advent of the cultured pearl and by the 1970s Broome was producing 60% to 70% of the world's large cultured pearls. In 1889, an undersea telegraph cable was laid from Broome to Singapore, connecting to England, hence the name of Cable Beach. Broome has many pearl shops and there are probably more pearl shops than pubs or botttle shops. quite an achievement for an Aussie town.

We also visited the famous Matso's Broome Brewery and I sampled the award winning Smokey Bishop dark lager.... Lorraine had Mango beer!!

Stairway to the Moon, Roebuck Bay, Broome

Stairway to the Moon, Roebuck Bay, Broome


Stairway to the Moon, Roebuck Bay, Broome

Stairway to the Moon, Roebuck Bay, Broome


Divers' statue, Broome

Divers' statue, Broome


Matso's Brewery, Broome

Matso's Brewery, Broome


Roebuck Bay, Broome

Roebuck Bay, Broome


Gantheaume Point, Broome

Gantheaume Point, Broome


Gantheaume Point, Broome

Gantheaume Point, Broome


Roebuck Bay, Broome

Roebuck Bay, Broome


Tropical storm over Roebuck Bay

Tropical storm over Roebuck Bay

Posted by KobusM 04:07 Archived in Australia Comments (1)

Permit to travel through Aboriginal land

Is this Apartheid Aussie style?

We had to apply and be issued with a permit to travel through Aboriginal land on our way from Broome to Middle Lagoon and Cape Leveque next week. The permits are a legal requirement to visit or travel through Aboriginal reserves and the official reason given is that the system is designed to help protect the privacy of the Aboriginal communities, preserve Aboriginal heritage and culture, safeguard the natural environment and to promote visitor safety. http://www.dia.wa.gov.au/en/Entry-Permits/

This reminds me of the old Apartheid South Africa, when we created reserves (home lands) for the different black tribes and controlled it with permits and passes.

I am not sure if the Aboriginal reserve and permit system is the design of the Australian government or if it is designed and required by the Aboriginal communities themselves. Maybe someone can enlighten me.

Posted by KobusM 19:16 Archived in Australia Comments (0)

Cossack

WA's ghost town

sunny 38 °C

This blog is a little belated as we visited Cossack on the way from Dampier to Eighty Mile Beach, but it is worth while mentioning.

Cossack was the home to the North West's first pearling industry in the late 1800's and early 1900's , but due to the over fishing of the Cossack pearling grounds the pearling fleet moved to Broome in the 1950's. The village has been restored to it's original splendour and is an interresting place to visit. Nobody lives in Cossack except for a caretaker.

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Cossack

Cossack


Cossack

Cossack

Posted by KobusM 05:36 Archived in Australia Tagged town ghost Comments (0)

Eighty Mile Beach

Stopover paradise

sunny 37 °C

Eighty Mile Beach is a very pleasant caravan park, 9km off the Great Northern Highway between Port Hedland and Broome, on the beach and in the middle of nowhere. The beach is really eighty miles long and is great for beach driving and shell collecting. I have never seen so many shells on a beach in my life. The place is peaceful and tranquil and we could have stayed much longer but in the end stayed three days and twice took the opportunity to drive on the beach for many kilometers. It is easy to find a remote spot on the beach, just park anywhere. It is the longest and broadest beach I have ever seen and I just loved it.

Eighty Mile Beach was devastated by a cyclone in December 2008 and the trees in the caravan park still show signs of a heavy battering.

There is no mobile phone or broadband coverage on Eighty Mile Beach so we could not be distracted by the internet but could also only post the blog until after our arrival in Broome. We will be spending Easter weekend in Broome.

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Shell collection on Eighty Mile Beach

Shell collection on Eighty Mile Beach

Posted by KobusM 01:42 Archived in Australia Comments (3)

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