A Travellerspoint blog

Coorong National Park

Salwater lagoon park

sunny 28 °C

From Mount Gambier we travelled north-west with a short detour to see the jetty at the picturesque town of Seaport and stopped at Kingston SE to take a photograph of Larry the Big Lobster, before we travelled north to the Coorong National Park.

Stretching more than 130 kilometres, Coorong National Park protects a string of saltwater lagoons which are protected from the Southern Ocean by the sweeping sand dunes of the Younghusband Peninsula. The 110 kilometer stretch of salwater lakes and lagoons is an important breeding area for the Australian pelican and is a refuge for ducks, swans, cormorants, terns, emus and numerous species of migratory birds.

We camped at Parnka Point on the shores of one of the Coorong lagoons. It was a nice campsite but the flies spoiled our fun during the day. We were also swamped by bees trying to drink water from our external taps, an indication that there were no fresh water available in the area.

Tomorrow we will travel to Cape Jervis on the Fleurieu Peninsula to catch the ferry to Kangaroo Island, which we plan to explore for 10 days.

Kingston Big Lobster

Kingston Big Lobster

Beachport Jetty

Beachport Jetty

The Coorong

The Coorong

Parnka Point campsite

Parnka Point campsite

Coorong salt lakes

Coorong salt lakes

Coorong sunset

Coorong sunset

Pelicans on the Coorong

Pelicans on the Coorong

Emu

Emu

Pelicans

Pelicans

Posted by KobusM 01:18 Archived in Australia Comments (1)

Mount Gambier

South Australia's town of volcanic lakes

semi-overcast 24 °C

We left Killarney and stopped for lunch at Lower Glenelg National Park. We decided not to camp there and travelled further across the border into South Australia, changed our clocks back 30 minutes (strange time zones in SA and NT!) and drove to Mount Gambier and stayed here for a couple of days.

This is our second visit to South Australia on this tour. We visited it briefly for 6 days in July 2012, travelling through Coober Pedy, Lake Eyre, the Oodnadata Track, Marree and the Birdsville Track. This time our stay in South Australia will be about 38 days.

Mount Gambier is famous for its 'Blue Lake' which changes colour dramatically each year. The Blue Lake is just one of the lakes within the three craters of the inactive volcano also named Mount Gambier. During December to March, the lake turns to a vibrant cobalt blue colour, returning to a colder steel grey colour for April to November. It is generally considered likely that it revolves around the warming of the surface layers of the lake during the summer months to around 20 degrees Celsius, causing calcium carbonate to precipitate out of solution and enabling micro-crystallites of calcium carbonate to form. The less colourful Valley Lake has a delightful recreational area with lots of birds and wildlife to watch.

From Mount Gambier we will travel north-west along the Limestone Coast to camp in Little Dip Conservation Park and/or Coorong National Park.

Blue Lake

Blue Lake

Leg of Mutton Crater

Leg of Mutton Crater

Valley Lake

Valley Lake

Purple Swamphen

Purple Swamphen

Eurasian Coot

Eurasian Coot

Posted by KobusM 23:29 Archived in Australia Comments (0)

Great Ocean Road

South West Victoria

sunny 25 °C

After spending four days with Lorraine's brother Jon and his partner Ali in Melton, west of Melbourne, we headed south-west on our last leg of our Big Lap that will take us 2 months to travel the western part of Victoria, South Australia and through the Nullabor to Esperance in Western Australia. Lorraine wrote her exams in Melbourne and she got her results for the Clinical Coding exam today. She passed with 93%!

We travelled the famous Great Ocean Road through Anglesea, Lorne, Point Hawdon and Apollo Bay to Great Otway National Park to camp a couple of days at Johanna Beach. The park features rugged coastlines, sandy beaches, rock platforms and windswept heathland. In the north, the park features tall forests, ferny gullies, waterfalls and tranquil lakes. The campsites at Johanna Beach are free with no facilities except a toilet and it was surprisingly busy. Johanna Beach and the Johanna River are named after the schooner Joanna that ran aground and was wrecked here on its maiden voyage from Launceston Tasmania, in September 1843. One crewman drowned.

From Johanna Beach we travel the rest of the Great Ocean Road and stopped at the Twelve Apostles, The Arch, London Bridge, The Grotto, Bay of Martyrs and the Bay of Islands in Port Campbell National Park. Exhausted after too much sightseeing we travelled to Killarney Beach to camp overnight before travelling further tomorrow to Lower Glenelg National Park.

Tonight we have a double celebration: Lorraine's exam results and one year since we arrived in Perth for this Big Lap tour.

Views from the Great Ocean Road

Views from the Great Ocean Road

Sunset at Johanna Beach

Sunset at Johanna Beach

Two of the Twelve Apostles

Two of the Twelve Apostles

Twelve Apostles

Twelve Apostles

The Arch

The Arch

The Grotto

The Grotto

London Bridge

London Bridge

Rugged coastline at Port Campbell

Rugged coastline at Port Campbell

Port Campbell National Park

Port Campbell National Park

Bay of Martyrs

Bay of Martyrs

Bay of Islands

Bay of Islands

Posted by KobusM 20:11 Archived in Australia Comments (2)

Devonport

Our last stay in Tasmania

semi-overcast 24 °C

From Cradle Mountain we travelled back to Devonport where we camped one night next to the Devonport Swans footy field before we will sail back to Melbourne on the Spirit of Tasmania later tonight.

Devonport is situated at the mouth of the Mersey River and is Tasmania's third largest city and is most known as the port of the Spirit of Tasmania, the vehicle ferry connecting Melbourne and Tasmania.

We have thorougly enjoyed our seven weeks of travelling around Tasmania. The rugged west coast, the remote south-west wilderness, delightful Bruny Island, the beautiful east coast - especially Bay of Fires - and the magnificent mountains, especially Walls of Jerusalem and Cradle Mountain and their glacial lakes, were all highlights of our tour. We have enjoyed good weather, especially during the last 5 weeks, but I must admit, I don't want to camp here during winter! The wildlife is exotic and I am still cursing the Tasmanian devil that stole one of my Crocs. The food, especially the seafood, was devine and the wine world class. We will have good memories of Tassie.

Devonport

Devonport

Home of the Devonport Swans

Home of the Devonport Swans

Spirit of Tasmania

Spirit of Tasmania

Devonport at dusk

Devonport at dusk

Goodbye Tasmania!

Goodbye Tasmania!

Posted by KobusM 21:32 Archived in Australia Comments (0)

Cradle Mountain National Park

Tasmania Wilderness World Heritage Area

sunny 26 °C

Tasmania's most recognisable landmark is the craggy profile of Cradle Mountain reflected in the waters of Dove Lake and we were eager to see this for ourselves. We camped at the caravan park near the visitors center in Cradle Mountain National Park and did a trip to Dove Lake in the park.

The park, which is part of the Tasmania Wilderness World Heritage Area, covers an area of almost 125,000 ha which is characterised by a rugged, glaciated landscape with over 25 major peaks and a wide range of glacial lakes, U-shaped valleys and waterfalls.

We did the 6,2 km circuit walk around Dove Lake on a cloudless day and the jagged contours of Cradle Mountain reflected in the tannin stained waters of Dove Lake epitomises the feel of a wild landscape. Ancient pines mirrored in the still waters of this glacial lake and temperate rain forests with pandani palms add to the harmony of the scenes around the lake. We also detoured to Lake Lilla, another glacial lake, close to Dove Lake.

We will travel back to Devonport today to board the Spirit of Tasmania back to Melbourne tomorrow evening.

Cradle Mountain reflection

Cradle Mountain reflection

Dove Lake and Cradle Mountain

Dove Lake and Cradle Mountain

Cradle Mountain

Cradle Mountain

Cradle Mountain

Cradle Mountain

Dove Lake beach

Dove Lake beach

Temperate rain forest

Temperate rain forest

Pandani palms

Pandani palms

Lake Lilla

Lake Lilla

Posted by KobusM 13:27 Archived in Australia Comments (2)

Gowrie Park and Sheffield

An abandoned village and a town of murals

sunny 25 °C

We camped at the small village of Gowrie Park which is located 16 km south of Sheffield and used to be a hydro construction village in the 60's. The construction of the Mersey-Forth Power Development Scheme in 1963 saw the town grow dramatically to about 3000 inhabitants. In 1969 there were 1800 people working on the project. After the completion of the power scheme - seven dams and seven power stations - in 1973 the town's population declined rapidly to a handful today. The streets are abandoned with only a few residential homes, a caravan-cabin park and a restaurant left. The restaurant serves excellent food. The scenery in the area is stunning with Mt. Roland and Mt. Vandyke dominating the southern horison. At our campsite (Gowrie Park Wilderness Park) we saw many Tasmanian pademelons who were very inquisitive and liked to have close inspection of the Quantum.

We took a drive to the delightful little town Sheffield which has huge and fascinating murals on every available blank wall in town. The first mural in Sheffield was unveiled in December 1986. Since then over sixty murals depicting the area's rich history and beautiful natural scenery have been painted on walls scattered throughout the town and buildings along the roadside.

Tomorrow we will travel to Cradle Mountain National Park.

Abandoned streets of Gowrie Park

Abandoned streets of Gowrie Park

Gowrie Park

Gowrie Park

Mt Vandyke

Mt Vandyke

One of the few residential homes left in Gowrie Park

One of the few residential homes left in Gowrie Park

Weindorfers Restaurant at Gowrie Park

Weindorfers Restaurant at Gowrie Park

Hang in there!

Hang in there!

Sheffield Tasmania

Sheffield Tasmania

Sheffield's Chinese mural

Sheffield's Chinese mural

Sheffield mural

Sheffield mural

Sheffield blacksmith mural

Sheffield blacksmith mural

Sheffield Bible Chapel

Sheffield Bible Chapel

Original Sheffield mural

Original Sheffield mural

Old Sheffield town mural

Old Sheffield town mural

Bank mural in Sheffield

Bank mural in Sheffield

Posted by KobusM 20:11 Archived in Australia Comments (1)

Walls of Jerusalem

Remote alpine wilderness in Tasmania

sunny 24 °C

As the Walls of Jerusalem National Park has no vehicle based camspites, we camped in the Mole Creek Karst National Park next to the Mersey River. The Walls of Jerusalem National Park forms part of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area and the park is remote and not accessible by road and therefore retains its wilderness character.

We decided to hike up to The Walls on my birthday and parked the Cruiser near Lake Rowallan where the walk starts. It is a very steep and rough walking trail that meanders through the forest and climbs almost 600m meters in altitude, past the Trappers Hut, before it reaches the alpine plateau. It took us 3 hours to reach a spot where we had the most maginficent views of the Walls of Jeruslaem to the east and Cradle Mountain to the west. On the way we walked past Solomon's Jewels, several placid alpine lakes that reminded us of the Swedish lakes.

We saw an olive green white-lipped snake busy swallowing his lunch, a lizard that was bigger than the snake. At the Wild Dog Creek Campsite we saw several wallabies in the bushes and close the campsite. The return hike took us more than 2 and a half hours and the downhills were heavy on our knees and feet. We reached the Cruiser exhausted and a cold beer never tasted better!

Trappers Hut

Trappers Hut

Burnt out!

Burnt out!

Magnificent views

Magnificent views

The Walls

The Walls

Easy part of the hike

Easy part of the hike

Alpine lakes

Alpine lakes

Lunch!

Lunch!

Wallaby

Wallaby

Walls of Jerusalem

Walls of Jerusalem

Patches of thick moss on the plateau

Patches of thick moss on the plateau

Posted by KobusM 18:36 Archived in Australia Comments (3)

Narawntapu National Park

The "Serengeti" of Tasmania

sunny 24 °C

From Beauty Point we travelled west through the forests on a very bad and steep gravel road to camp at Bakers Point in the Narawntapu National Park.

Dubbed the "Serengeti of Tasmania", Narawntapu National Park (formerly known as Asbestos Range National Park) is supposed to be one of the best places in Tasmania to view wildlife. The park boasts a rich array of easily observed animals that come out in the evening to graze on the grasslands. Some of the animals that we saw included the Forester kangaroo, Bennetts wallaby, Tasmanian pademelon, Common possum and Tiger snake.

Bakers Point is on the shores of Port Sorell, a big tidal inlet fed by the Franklin Rivulet. The campsite is nice and quiet with lots of sea birds nesting on the shores of the port. The bird hide at the lagoon allows you to view many water birds.

From here we travelled south to Mole Creek Karst National Park to explore the Walls of Jerusalem.

Baker Point campsite

Baker Point campsite

Bakers Beach

Bakers Beach

Port Sorell at high tide

Port Sorell at high tide

Port Sorell at low tide

Port Sorell at low tide

Bird hide

Bird hide

Black Swans

Black Swans

Chestnut Teal

Chestnut Teal

Eurasian Coot

Eurasian Coot

Oyster Catchers in flight

Oyster Catchers in flight

Pacific Gulls

Pacific Gulls

Pelican, oyster catchers and a tern

Pelican, oyster catchers and a tern

White-fronted Chat

White-fronted Chat

Tasmanian pademelon

Tasmanian pademelon

Posted by KobusM 17:22 Archived in Australia Comments (1)

Beauty Point

Platypus House and Seahorse World

sunny 25 °C

From Launceston we travelled north along the broad Tamar River to Beauty Point to visit Platypus House and Seahorse World.

Beautiful, exotic, mysterious and darn right odd are possible descriptions of the platypus. This reptile like mammal lays eggs and the male platypus have a hollow spur about 15 milimetres in length on the inside of both hind legs. This spur is connected to a venom gland, and the platypus uses this spur to defend itself against predators. Together with the echidna, it is the only species of monotremes: mammals that lay eggs instead of giving birth. Echidna are also known as spiny ant eaters.

Seahorses are my favourite small sea creatures. The male seahorse is equipped with a brood pouch on the ventral side of the tail. When mating, the female seahorse deposits up to 1,500 eggs in the male's pouch. The male carries the eggs for 9 to 45 days until the seahorses hatch and emerge from the pouch.

Beauty Point harbour

Beauty Point harbour

Amazing!

Amazing!

Feeding time

Feeding time

Exotic platupus

Exotic platupus

Echidna

Echidna

Seahorse world

Seahorse world

Pregnant male

Pregnant male

Yellow seahorse

Yellow seahorse

Posted by KobusM 22:37 Archived in Australia Comments (0)

Launceston

Tasmania's second largest city

semi-overcast 23 °C

Launceston is Tasmania's second largest city after Hobart and is home to several firsts such as the first use of anesthetics in the Southern Hemisphere, the first Australian city to have underground sewers and the first Australian city to be lit by hydroelectricity. Settled by Europeans in March 1806, Launceston is one of Australia's oldest cities (3rd) and is home to many historic buildings.

We did a walk through Launceston CBD to explore its Colonial and Victorian heritage and architecture. The old buildings and facades are beautiful and give a lot of character to Launceston or Lonnie as the Tassies call it.

We stayed in a caravan park 10 kilometers north of the city in Legana, the start of the Tamar Wine Route. From here we will travel north to Beauty Point and then to Narawntapu National Park on the north coast.

Launceston Hotel

Launceston Hotel

Launceston Post Office

Launceston Post Office

Launceston street scene

Launceston street scene

Motors Garage

Motors Garage

Old Bank

Old Bank

Bank of New South Wales 1817

Bank of New South Wales 1817

Boags Brewery

Boags Brewery

Delightful Launceston

Delightful Launceston

Quadrant Mall

Quadrant Mall

Posted by KobusM 22:16 Archived in Australia Comments (1)

Mount William National Park

Tasmania's remote north-east coast

sunny 27 °C

We left the Bay of Fires after a delightful stay on the beach for 5 days. We travelled back to St. Helens to fill up the water tanks in the Quantum and to buy some provisions for the next stretch of bush camping. We headed north through the state forest on a decent gravel road to Musselroe Bay.

Mount William National Park on Tasmania's far north-east coast is remote with undulating grasslands, large dunes, sweeping white beaches and an ocean varying from azure in the shallows to bright blue in deeper waters. The granite boulders in the surf zone are home to many sea birds like cormorants, terns and pelicans. We camped at Top Camp which is an oceanfront campsite on the beach between Musselroe Bay and Cape Naturaliste. Although it was a lovely spot the March (horse) flies and the ants were annoying and we cut our stay short to only two days.

From here we travelled to Launceston, Tasmania's second largest city.

Mt William National Park beach

Mt William National Park beach

Top Camp, Mt William National Park

Top Camp, Mt William National Park

View from Cape Naturaliste

View from Cape Naturaliste

Spider web

Spider web

Grass trees at sunset

Grass trees at sunset

Crested Terns

Crested Terns

Cormorants and a Pelican

Cormorants and a Pelican

Black-faced Cormorants

Black-faced Cormorants

Posted by KobusM 18:29 Archived in Australia Comments (1)

Bay of Fires

Tasmania's best beaches and the world's 'hottest' travel destination

semi-overcast 24 °C

The Bay of Fires Conservation Area starts a few kilometers north of the town of St. Helens on the north-east coast of Tasmania and extends from Binalong Bay in the south to Eddystone Point in the north. This unusual name was given to the area by the French explorer Captain Tobias Furneaux, in 1773, when he noticed numerous fires along the coast. This led him to believe that the country was densely populated. The Bay of Fires is famous for its white beaches, blue water and granite headlands splashed with orange lichen.

In 2009 Lonely Planet named The Bay of Fires as the world's 'hottest' travel destination. It is certainly 'hot' in the modern sense of the word but not in the literal sense. It was very cold the first night and temperatures during the sunny days that followed never exceeded 25 degrees. The Bay of Fires is described by Lonely Planet as "a castaway bay with a 29 kilometers ribbon of sea and surf spooling out from the old whaling town of St Helens, on Tasmania's north-east coast. White beaches of hourglass-fine sand, Bombay Sapphire sea and an azure sky. This is the secret edge of Tasmania, laid out like a pirate's treasure map of perfect beach after sheltered cove, all fringed with forests.”

There are many campgrounds along the bay and we chose Swimcart Beach to camp and found an absolute beachfront spot with fantastic views. It is a free camp with only a pit toilet but that doesn't bother us since the Quantum has everything we need. There is something magic about staying right on the water's edge and the sound of the waves crashing onto the beach adds to the atmosphere. The coastal bushes at the campsite are home to many Green Rosellas, found only in Tasmania, and many other birds.

We declared Bay of Fires is one of our top campsites and decided to stay for five days. Tomorrow we will travel north to Mount William National Park on the remote north-east coast.

Bay of Fires

Bay of Fires

Lichen covered rocks

Lichen covered rocks

Swimcart Beach

Swimcart Beach

Swimcart Beach campsite

Swimcart Beach campsite

Swimcart Beach on the Bay of Fires

Swimcart Beach on the Bay of Fires

Binalong Bay

Binalong Bay

Green Rosella

Green Rosella

Little Wattlebird

Little Wattlebird

Silver Gulls resting on the beach

Silver Gulls resting on the beach

Posted by KobusM 18:34 Archived in Australia Comments (1)

Freycinet National Park

Friendly beaches and a wineglass bay

sunny 24 °C

We travelled north from Tasman National Park and got our first flat tyre of the trip, which we had to get fixed in Swansea. A small piece of bone, most likely from one of the many marsupial carcasses found on Australian roads, pierced the right rear tyre.

We camped at Friendly Beaches in the northern part of Freycinet National Park. The beachfront campground is free and our site had sweeping views of Friendly Beaches and the Freycinet peninsula. The waves were huge and load at night and it is also a popular surfing spot. On the first day we saw a huge black tiger snake close to the toilets, basking in the sun. Tigers snakes are black in the south of Australia and in Tasmania and their tiger stripes are obscure. They are not very aggressive and will avoid humans but they are extremely venomous. The day before I also saw a black tiger snake in Fortesque Bay.

We travelled to Coles Bay for the day to buy more oysters and to visit some of the other sites in Freycinet National Park. Freycinet National Park is famous for its Wineglass Bay, one of the most iconic bays in Tasmania. We took the steep hiking trail to the lookout point to view the crystal clear waters and white sandy beach of Wineglass Bay from a distance. We also did the short walk at Cape Tourville which has stupendous coastal views of the Freycinet peninsula.

Our next stop will be the famous Bay of Fires on the north-east coast.

Friendly Beaches

Friendly Beaches

Friendly Beaches campground

Friendly Beaches campground

View of Friendly Beaches from the Quantum

View of Friendly Beaches from the Quantum

Friendly Beaches sunset

Friendly Beaches sunset

Black Tiger Snake

Black Tiger Snake

Not so friendly welcome on Friendly Beaches

Not so friendly welcome on Friendly Beaches

Coles Bay

Coles Bay

Cape Tourville lookout

Cape Tourville lookout

Freycinet National Park

Freycinet National Park

Freycinet Peninsula

Freycinet Peninsula

Wineglass Bay

Wineglass Bay

Surfer on Friendly Beach

Surfer on Friendly Beach

Posted by KobusM 19:20 Archived in Australia Comments (0)

Tasman National Park and Port Arthur

Tasmania's famous 'convict' peninsula

all seasons in one day 23 °C

We left Hobart on Australia Day and drove down to the Tasman Peninsula to camp at Fortesque Bay in the Tasman National Park. We past several areas and towns like Dunalley that were devastated by the recent bush fires. The northern part of the Tasman Peninsula was also burned down but luckilly did not reach the southern part of the Tasman National Park where we camped. The campsite was nice with many Bennetts Wallabies visiting in the evening. The Australia Day celebrations in the campground were traditional with prawn barbies and cricket.

Tasman National Park and Tasmania is named after the dutch explorer Abel Tasman, the first european that explored Tasmania and in particular this area in 1642.

The dramatic sea cliffs along the Tasman Peninsula are similar to the cliffs on South Bruny Island and among the highest and most spectacular in Australia. These columnar dolerite cliffs are outstanding examples of a rock type which is very rare on mainland Australia. We did a 10 kilometer return hike to Cape Hauy from Fortesque Bay, which was very steep in places but rewarded us with breathtaking views of the coastline and 200 meter high sea cliffs.

Other sites we visited were the Blowhole, Devil's Kitchen and Tasman's Arch and they are all easily accessible by car at the northern end of the park.

We took the opportunity to visit Port Arthur whilst we were in the Tasman Peninsula. From 1833, until 1853, Port Arthur was the destination for the hardest of convicted British and Irish criminals, those who were secondary offenders having re-offended after their arrival in Australia. Rebellious personalities from other convict stations were also sent here, a quite undesirable punishment. Port Arthur had some of the strictest security measures of the British penal system but also experimented with rehabilitation for the first time in colonial history. The Port Arthur complex is vast with many buildings to explore like the church, the hospital, the penetentiary, the seperate prison for solidatory confinement and the commandant's quarters.

From Fortesque Bay we travelled north to Freycinet National Park.

Dunalley bush fire ruins

Dunalley bush fire ruins

Fortesque Bay

Fortesque Bay

Fortesque Bay campground

Fortesque Bay campground

Bennet's Wallaby

Bennet's Wallaby

Cape Hauy

Cape Hauy

Dramtic sea cliffs at Cape Hauy

Dramtic sea cliffs at Cape Hauy

Fortesque Bay entrance from Cape Hauy

Fortesque Bay entrance from Cape Hauy

The Candlestick at Cape Hauy

The Candlestick at Cape Hauy

The Monument at Cape Hauy

The Monument at Cape Hauy

Tasman's Arch

Tasman's Arch

Devil's Kitchen

Devil's Kitchen

The Blowhole

The Blowhole

Port Arthur

Port Arthur

The Church at Port Arthur

The Church at Port Arthur

Seperate Prison cell

Seperate Prison cell

The Penetentiary

The Penetentiary

The hospital at Port Arthur

The hospital at Port Arthur

The Guard Tower at Port Arthur

The Guard Tower at Port Arthur

The Commandant's Quarters

The Commandant's Quarters

Posted by KobusM 20:49 Archived in Australia Comments (0)

Hobart

Capital of Tasmania

all seasons in one day 24 °C

Hobart was founded in 1804 as a penal colony and is Australia's second oldest capital city after Sydney, New South Wales. We stayed in the Discovery Holiday Park and used the opportunity to do washing and cleaning, preparing for our next stretch of bush camping that will last 18 days. I also had to get the winch on the Land Cruiser fixed which seized to wind up or down when we rescued the couple who got stuck near Strahan.

Whilst the Land Cruiser's winch was being fixed we did a walking tour of Hobart CBD, visiting Franklin Wharf and Salamanca Place which consists of rows of sandstone buildings, formerly warehouses for the port of Hobart Town that have since been converted into restaurants, galleries and craft shops. Battery Point, on the hill behind Salamanca Place, has rows of very quaint colonial style houses. The Maritime Museum was small but interesting.

We also visited the Cascade Brewery, which is the oldest brewery in Australia established in 1824, went on their brewery tour and sampled some of their best beers and ciders. The 'Beer' bell at the entrance of the brewery has an interesting history. In the early days of the brewery workers were allowed to "sample" beer at any time of the working day. Needless to say this led to dwindling of profits and some unruliness and a new rule was introduced: The 'Beer' bell was rung four times a day at morning tea, lunch time, afternoon tea and knock-off time when workers could quench their thirsts with a pint...or two. Not a bad place to work! This all changed in modern times when the management stopped the 'Beer' bell practice but this led to a go-slow strike and the negotiated compromise was that every permanent worker gets a carton of beer (24) to take home every fortnight, a practice that is still being upheld today.

Hobart's skyline is dominated by Mount Wellington at 1,271 meters above sea level and we took a drive up the steep Pinnacle Road to the top of the wind swept mountain to admire the breathtaking views of Hobart and beyond.

Southern Brown Bandicoots were frequent visitors to our campsite in the evenings and came close enough for clear photographs.

From Hobart we will travel south-east to the Tasman Peninsula to camp at Fortesque Bay.

Hobart CBD

Hobart CBD

Salamanca Market

Salamanca Market

Salamanca Place

Salamanca Place

Battery Point houses

Battery Point houses

Franklin Wharf

Franklin Wharf

Franklin Wharf sculptures

Franklin Wharf sculptures

Diver suit in the Maritime Museum

Diver suit in the Maritime Museum

Cascade Brewery

Cascade Brewery

The 'Beer' bell at the entrance of the Cascade Brewery

The 'Beer' bell at the entrance of the Cascade Brewery

View from Mt Wellington

View from Mt Wellington

Southern Brown Bandicoot

Southern Brown Bandicoot

Posted by KobusM 22:18 Archived in Australia Comments (0)

(Entries 16 - 30 of 153) « Page 1 [2] 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 .. »